Saturday, July 22, 2017

Erik of Tenkar's Tavern has posted a great interview of Tim Kask he found. The video was posted back in October last year on the Dorks of Yore channel, but I somehow missed it until Erik pointed it out.

Tim Kask talks about the early early days of TSR with lots of anecdotes (and some pie) about those days long ago when this weird little game called Dungeons & Dragons just came out which nobody really quite understood yet. It's nearly two hours long, only meandering occasionally, and a great ride through TSR history.


Friday, July 21, 2017

XMas in July sale 2017

It is DriveThruRPG's annual big sale. I've included all the Night Owl Workshop products in the sale, so that's 25% off everything.

I'm picking up several things for myself including White Box Gothic, and Dyson's Delves.

Head on over: http://drivethrurpg.com/browse/pub/6385/Night-Owl-Workshop


Saturday, July 15, 2017

A firefighter, a soldier in full gear, and a medieval armored fighter


"A firefighter and a soldier in full gear bear the same load as a medieval armoured fighter. Which one will perform best on the run?"

This video displayed in the exhibition "Armatus Corpus" at the Military Museum, Castle of Morges, Switzerland is a pretty fascinating comparison. The clip shows how well designed medieval armor really was.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAzI1UvlQqw

Friday, July 14, 2017

Raiders of the Lost Artifacts Review


Review of Raiders of the Lost Artifacts on Reviews from R'yleh
what you have is a really fun game supported by lots of useful information and background material. In fact, it would be useful no matter the rules you used as it could be easily adapted were you so inclined, though it would be interesting to see a post-‘Original Edition Compatible’ version of the game. Overall, the impressive background detail and the obvious love for the subgenre is what shines through in Raiders of the Lost Artifacts: Original Edition Rules for Fantastic Archaeological Adventures and makes you want to run games of Pulp action and archaeological adventure.
Overall a positive review. Interestingly one of the criticisms in the review is what has been considered a strength by most players, and that is the simple straightforward character creation system that doesn't get bogged down in much detail. This is an intentional design goal of all these ODD (original design do-over) games. I think the background system addresses some of the issues about character diversity that are brought up, but YMMV.

Link to the review here: http://rlyehreviews.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/pulp-dungeon-pillaging.html

Friday, July 7, 2017

Cavaliers & Roundheads - TSR's first book

A common misconception is that Chainmail was TSR's first book and out of that came OD&D. The history is much more convoluted and interesting than that.

Cavaliers & Roundheads was TSR's first publication, and the sales were intended to help fund publishing OD&D. In a cruel twist of fate things went awry and the history of TSR became a convoluted mess after that. But that is another story.

OD&D was already well into development when Cavaliers & Roundheads was published. So this game had little impact on OD&D except in a few cosmetic ways. The format of the book: saddle-stitched digest sized. A cover that established the basic layout printed monochrome on textured paper. Plain san serif font body text, clean simple layout. Crude amateurish art.

Cavaliers & Roundheads is like a cliff's notes version of Chainmail. It is succinct, to the point, has no fluff except a couple of pages of art describing uniforms. And it is musketeer-like focused on its topic: the English Civil War of 1642. No dragons, no uber powered Landsknechte, just English, Scottish, and Irish troops battling for the political fate of the Kingdom of England. Even if you're not a history buff you've no doubt heard the famous name Oliver Cromwell, this war is why.

 



Skimming through it the system appears very similar if not identical to Chainmail. Considering it has the same authors that isn't surprising. I just got this copy and am still reading through it, I hope to get a few play tests in to get a feel for how it works. I've started a post over at ODD74 if you want to follow along as I read and comment on it.

http://odd74.proboards.com/thread/12450/read-cavaliers-roundheads

Friday, June 30, 2017

Beastie of the Week: Gnomblin

Last week the family went to DisneyWorld, while we had a blast we all came back with the plague. So between coughing fits and sleeping from taking too much NyQuil I have managed to draw a few new beasties. I've been fiddling with the description for this gnomblin and while I have lots of ideas, I've got nothing really coherent yet.

In order to get a good post in this week I'm posting this one in very rough form with an outline that kind of shows the process of how I think about generating the stats and abilities for a new beastie.

Big Concept: Gnome + Goblin
Gnomes are kind-hearted, family oriented illusionists, goblins are chaotic little murder machines who hate the light. Common theme: both dwell in the underground and are diminutive in size.

Gnomblin
Goblinoid
HD 1/2 to 2
AC 13 to 16
 Atk 1 weapon (1d6)
Move 9
Save 18 to 13
CL/XP B/10
Special: -1 to hit in sunlight.

Illusion spells levels 1-3 (define spell list).

A gnomblin has magical ability equivalent to double its hit dice. Gnomblins save vs. magic or wands with a +4 bonus. It is theoretically possible for individuals of even greater power to exist. The Game Master can roll spells randomly or determine appropriate choices from the Magic-User spell list.

I've been developing this idea of goblins being fecund; willing to breed with anything and everything. Because of their unique DNA they are able to create offspring, mostly sterile, with almost any humanoid. This opens up no end of options for interesting little goblin+ hybrids. I've been having a lot of fun drawing these little beasties, and hope you are enjoying them too, I have several more in the pipeline. Also the Gnome/Goblin war of 576 which I have a LOT more to say about in the future.




Monday, June 26, 2017

Freebooters Review on Save or Die!


The Save or Die podcast reviewed our Age of Pirates old-school roleplaying game Freebooters! And they really gush about it, I'm almost embarrassed, but glad they love it so much. One of the things they note is how painstakingly researched the setting is and how historically accurate it is. This is not a fantasy game! Yes, it does include an optional character class that has magic, but it is respectful of the customs and beliefs of the region during the period and it is purely optional. Everything else about the game is rooted in realism and historical accuracy.

http://saveordie.info/?p=1584

Interestingly one of the members on the podcast has his own YouTube channel, Ol' Man Grognard, where he has reviewed several Night Owl Workshop books. His reviews are worth watching for anyone who enjoys OSR games.